SLAC Logo
Linac Coherent Light Source
LCLS
LCLS News

by LCLS Announcement
Call for Proposed Experiments with Soft and Hard X-rays at the LCLS AMO, SXR, XPP, CXI, XCS, and MEC Experimental Stations. LCLS encourages scientists from diverse fields to propose experiments utilizing the LCLS’s unique capabilities to be carried out January – May 2013. Proposed experiments must be submitted by 4 pm Pacific, July 10, 2012. more...
by LCLS News
A surprising atomic-scale wiggle underlies the way a special class of materials reacts to light, according to research that may lead to new devices for harvesting solar energy. more...
by LCLS News
Scientists have found a way to distort the atomic arrangement and change the magnetic properties of an important class of electronic materials with ultra-short pulses of terahertz (mid-infrared) laser light without heating up the material. more...
SLAC Press Release
Scientists working at LCLS have created the shortest, purest X-ray laser pulses ever achieved, fulfilling a 45-year-old prediction and opening the door to a new range of scientific discovery. more...
SLAC Press Release
Researchers working at LCLS have used the world’s most powerful X-ray laser to create and probe a 2-million-degree piece of matter in a controlled way for the first time. This feat, reported today in Nature, takes scientists a significant step forward in understanding the most extreme matter found in the hearts of stars and giant planets, and could help experiments aimed at recreating the nuclear fusion process that powers the sun. more...
by LCLS News
When an electron is propelled out of an atom’s innermost orbital, the hole the departing electron leaves usually is filled within a few micro-billionths of a second by a different electron moving in from a higher orbital. But is there a way to force the original electron back where it came from, making the atom immune to such electron rearrangements? more...
by LCLS News
An international research team headed by DESY scientists from the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science (CFEL) in Hamburg, Germany, has recorded the shortest X-ray exposure of a protein crystal ever achieved. The incredible brief exposure time of 30 femtoseconds (0.000 000 000 000 03 seconds) opens up new possibilities for imaging molecular processes with X-rays. more...
by LCLS News
The Linac Coherent Light Source doesn't shut down for the Thanksgiving holiday, so LCLS laser division member Ryan Coffee and the rest of his team did the next best thing: They brought Thanksgiving dinner to their experiment. more...
by LCLS News
In 2009, when biophysicist Ilme Schlichting and her colleagues applied to use the X-ray laser at SLAC’s Linac Coherent Light Source, they added a radical idea to their proposal: They would make all the data they collected on two viruses and a nanoparticle available to the public one year after the experiment ended. more...
by LCLS Announcement
After four hugely successful runs, operation of the Linac Coherent Light Source has been paused briefly to prepare for the Nov. 17 start of Run 5 – the first that will see all six experimental stations come online. more...
by LCLS Announcement
Using leftover high-speed electrons from SLAC’s Linac Coherent Light Source, researchers have successfully generated intense pulses of light in a largely untapped part of the electromagnetic spectrum – the so-called terahertz gap. more...
by LCLS Announcement
The Department of Energy has approved a preliminary budget, schedule and design plans for the LCLS-II project, an expansion of SLAC’s Linac Coherent Light Source. This approval, known as “Critical Decision 1” (CD-1), sets the stage for the development of a more detailed engineering plan for the project. more...
by LCLS News
When Richard “Dick” Lee arrives at SLAC today to assume his duties heading up the Science, Research and Development Division of the Linac Coherent Light Source, he’ll feel right at home. more...
by LCLS News
Diamonds can add more than sparkle and style to X-ray experiments at the Linac Coherent Light Source. They are giving scientists a way to focus the LCLS's powerful X-rays to a much tinier, brighter point without destroying the very device that does the focusing. more...
by LCLS News
The great thing about SLAC’s Linac Coherent Light Source is that it churns out incredible volumes of data about things no one has ever seen before, such as snapshots of individual viruses. more...
by LCLS Announcement
A new X-ray technique for producing instantaneous nanoscale images of the magnetic polarity in materials has been demonstrated by LCLS scientist Joshua Turner. Such a capability is important for understanding the basics of magnetism and how new "spintronic" materials would behave in future energy-efficient computers, digital memories and data storage devices. more...
The drive laser installation team.
by LCLS Announcement
This week marks the fifth anniversary of first light for the injector drive laser, a vital component of the Linac Coherent Light Source used to provide the supply of electrons needed by the world's first hard X-ray free electron laser. more...
by LCLS News
The LCLS is the world’s first hard X-ray free-electron laser and one of the most complex light sources ever developed. Its ultrashort pulses of X-ray laser light, a billion times brighter than any light source before it, are uniquely capable of probing the detailed structure and dynamics of atoms, molecules, and materials. But this brilliant beam is not the only laser at work in the LCLS. Other ultrafast lasers kick off the process that generates the X-ray laser beam and play an essential role i more...
by LCLS Announcement
"It takes a village," as Hillary Clinton famously wrote, "to raise a child." Similarly, says physicist Claudio Pellegrini, it takes an entire scientific community to create a ground-breaking new piece of technology—one that not only adds to the store of human knowledge through its use, but requires its designers to push back scientific and technological frontiers just to build it in the first place. The Linac Coherent Light Source is a case in point. more...
by Brad Plummer
This test undulator is on loan from Argonne National Laboratory and currently resides in SLAC's Building 26, where the Metrology Department's Magnetic Measurement Group is trying out measurement techniques to be used on the LCLS II project, a proposed second X-ray free-electron laser that would expand on SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source. more...
by Brad Plummer
The Resonant Soft X-ray Scattering endstation at the Linac Coherent Light Source Soft X-ray beamline is a vacuum chamber and sample environment that enables researchers to probe how electrons behave in special materials, such as magnets or high-temperature superconductors. more...
by LCLS Announcement
Shutdown doesn't mean slow down for workers at the LCLS. With three successful experimental runs completed at the world's most powerful X-ray laser, scientists turned off the X-ray beam in March so they could install and maintain equipment, make improvements and prepare for the next run of experiments. more...
by LCLS Announcement
A buzz of activity disturbed the morning quiet on Saturday as a 9000-pound vacuum chamber and a 6000-pound laser optics table traveled by forklift from Building 750 into the Linac Coherent Light Source's Far Experimental Hall. more...
by Jo Stöhr
Over the first year and a half of LCLS operation we have moved full speed ahead. It is a very exciting time that’s only going to get more exciting as we work to further improve LCLS. more...
by LCLS Announcement
A 30-year-old laser built to simulate the conditions at the heart of a nuclear explosion arrived at SLAC last week, where members of the Linac Coherent Light Source's Laser Science and Technology Department want to put it to a more peaceful use. more...
by LCLS Announcement
SLAC's new photon science seminar series stimulates scientific exchange by bringing together scientists from across Stanford and SLAC institutes and facilities. more...
by LCLS Announcement
On April 1, Chinese Academy of Sciences President Yongxiang Lu and his colleagues visited Stanford University and SLAC for the first time. A tour of the Klystron Gallery Visitor's Alcove and the LCLS Near Experimental Hall were among the highlights of their visit. more...
by LCLS News
The Linac Coherent Light Source construction project was awarded the Secretary's Award of Excellence at a ceremony in Alexandria, VA, On March 16, 2011, during the annual Department of Energy Project Management Workshop. more...
by Kelen Tuttle
In the first 18 months of Linac Coherent Light Source operation, the electron beam that drives the X-ray laser has exceeded expectations—so much so that SLAC's accelerator operators can offer impressive flexibility in crafting the beam to suit experiments, often changing its performance in mere minutes. more...
by LCLS News
The first set of user experiments with the Linac Coherent Light Source's newest instrument is under way, and about 40 researchers are working very long hours this week to decipher the structures of proteins involved in photosynthesis, parasitic disease and other important life processes. more...
by Jo Stöhr
We in SLAC management haven't yet seen the written report, but the verbal closeout of the Department of Energy's first review of the Linac Coherent Light Source as a national user facility couldn't have been much better. more...
by LCLS Announcement
The Coherent X-ray Imaging instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source achieved the first X-ray image from its newly installed detector last Tuesday. The detector was installed inside the instrument’s vacuum-sealed experimental chamber in January. Through this week, CXI instrument scientists will test and adjust the new device in preparation for arrival of the first experimental users this Sunday. more...
by LCLS News
Two studies published in Nature demonstrate how the unique capabilities of the world's first hard X-ray free-electron laser—the Linac Coherent Light Source, located at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory—could revolutionize the study of life. more...
Norbert Holtkamp
by LCLS News
"The premier electron accelerator laboratory." This title is not only part of the mission statement of SLAC, it is what I have so far observed every day at work. I enjoy the eight o'clock meetings in the Main Control Center when the accelerator people talk about the last 24 hours and the plans for the week. This is then followed by the Linac Coherent Light Source users presenting and explaining the data taken. more...
LCLS Undulator Hall
by Shawne Workman
Last week, the Linac Coherent Light Source came back online within two days after the holiday hiatus. On Thursday, the LCLS team ramped the X-ray laser up to its full design rate of 120 pulses per second—twice its previous operating rate—for the first time. And like the first attempts to create X-ray laser light at LCLS in 2009, it worked elegantly. more...
Jo Stohr
by Jo Stöhr
What a year it’s been for the Linac Coherent Light Source! We have now operated the x-ray laser for an entire year and, looking back, what has surprised me the most is the reliability record we’ve managed to uphold. more...
CXI
by LCLS News
X-rays entered the Linac Coherent Light Source's Far Experimental Hall for the first time Saturday, as part of commissioning for the Coherent X-ray Imaging instrument. more...
by LCLS News
A year and a half ago, the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory fired up the world's first hard x-ray laser. Shining 10 billion times as bright as any previous x-ray source, the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) would probe matter in new ways: simulating conditions within a planet's core, resolving the ultrafast changes in a material's atomic-scale architecture, and determining the structure of a protein from individual molecules. Now scientists have results from the first experiments... more...
by LCLS News
The Linac Coherent Light Source encourages scientists from diverse fields to submit proposals for experiments that utilize the LCLS’s unique capabilities. Five experimental stations are fully available to users (AMO, SXR, XPP, CXI, XCS). In addition, the MEC instrument will be available with limited capability. more...
Theresa Wong
by LCLS News
If staff members or visitors at the Linac Coherent Light Source have a request, chances are that Theresa Wong will help them. And she'll do it all with her radiant smile. Wong is one of four administrative assistants at the LCLS who do everything from processing daily facilities requests to coordinating major meetings and events. more...
by Kelen Tuttle
Last week's Linac Coherent Light Source and Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Users' Meeting packed more than 30 opening and plenary presentations and 60 breakout workshop talks into four and a half days, offering LCLS and SSRL users and staff the opportunity to learn about the latest plans, developments and user research at SLAC's lightsource facilities. more...
Interference pattern
by LCLS News
The third round of experiments at the Linac Coherent Light Source began earlier this month at a whole new level of capability. more...
by Cathy Knotts
Plan to attend the next LCLS Users' Conference, Workshops and UEC Meeting, and cast your vote for the next CXI representative to the LCLS Users' Executive Committee. Multiple activities are scheduled October 17-21, 2010. more...
by LCLS News
The dedication of the LCLS was just two months ago but the free-electron laser community is already actively planning for the future, as demonstrated by "Towards a Fifth Generation Light Source," a two-day workshop held on Santa Catalina Island recently. The workshop drew a sizable crowd of SLAC and SLAC-affiliated scientists, who made up almost half of the more than 50 attendees. They gathered for two purposes: to discuss possible future directions for fifth-generation lightsources, and to hono more...
by LCLS News
Our brainstorming sessions came up with a new option which not only provides a good LCLS II solution by 2017 but also offers dramatic improvements in instrumentation and operation in the time period 2017–2025 toward LCLS 2025 . The key change from the baseline LCLS II option is to already incorporate construction of the second branch, consisting of a new tunnel and experimental hall. In contrast to the baseline or "one tunnel" option, which upgrades and extends instrumentation within the existin more...
by LCLS News
The X-ray Pump Probe (XPP) instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source is installed and ready for its first user experiments several weeks ahead of schedule, thanks in part to funds provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment which supported more than 40% of the XPP project. The instrument will take advantage of the ultrafast X-ray pulses delivered by the LCLS beam to observe important chemical and biological processes, including the photosynthetic generation of chemical energy and the more...
by LCLS News
Associate Laboratory Director of the Linac Coherent Light Source and Photon Sciences Professor Jo Stöhr received a "belated birthday present" earlier this week when he received notification that he had won the 2011 Davisson-Germer Prize from the American Physical Society "For the development of soft-X-ray-based spectroscopy and microscopy leading to fundamental contributions to the understanding of chemical bonding, magnetism and dynamics at surfaces and interfaces." Jo was recognized for semina more...
by Cathy Knotts
Registration is open for the annual LCLS/SSRL Users' Conference, October 17–21. The event is a valuable opportunity to learn about the latest plans, developments and exciting user research at LCLS and SSRL. The conference will feature several LCLS workshops including: LCLS II; Data Analysis; Bio XFEL; HEDS; AMO; and SXR. The plenary session on October 18 will include updates from the DOE, LCLS and SSRL, a user science poster session and reception, and a keynote talk from Jens Norskov on 'Convert more...
by LCLS News
It's been a busy time here at LCLS. To date, we received 314 proposals from 1,094 scientists from 25 countries - a very impressive metric of interest in the LCLS from the scientific community! We expanded the LCLS Proposal Review Panel to over 50 experts in 7 areas. The PRP met 9/13-14 to review and rank 116 proposals submitted for Run 4 which is scheduled to start at the end of May 2011. The top ranked proposals are currently undergoing feasibility and safety reviews. We expect to notify the pr more...
by LCLS News
SLAC riggers, vacuum assembly personnel and scientists moved the central piece of the Coherent X-ray Imaging instrument into the Far Experimental Hall of the Linac Coherent Light Source. The 4,000 pound, red girder and primary chamber assembly made their way to the FEH at one mile an hour, strapped to a flatbed trailer. There, the team guided the instrument down the tunnel incline and into the CXI hutch, the middle of three hutches in the FEH. Assembly crews will mount a further complement of in more...
by LCLS News
SUNCAT—the Center for Sustainable Energy through Catalysis—is a new initiative in the SLAC Photon Science Directorate that will focus on creating better catalysts for use in alternative energy industries. The Center is lead by Jens Nørskov, who arrived at the beginning of June from his previous appointment as Director of the Center for Atomic-scale Materials Design at the Technical University of Denmark. Nørskov and his team want to gain such a clear and comprehensive understanding of catalytic more...
by LCLS News
Stanford applied physics graduate student Diling Zhu has been chosen as the recipient of the 2010 Melvin P. Klein Scientific Development Award for his work at SLAC's Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource. Zhu, who completed his Ph.D. research in the Stöhr group, will accept the award October 18 at the joint SSRL-Linac Coherent Lightsource Users' Meeting. The Klein award has been given annually since 2006 to undergraduates, graduate students and postdocs for outstanding research conducted more...
by LCLS News
Barely two months after publication of the first LCLS results on hollow atoms, two papers published in Physical Review Letters unveil the first results for hollow molecules. These studies show that the unprecedented intensity of the LCLS beam can reveal detailed information about a molecule's structure and dynamics. "The LCLS is proving its mettle as a machine for discovery in strong-field atomic and molecular physics," said Phil Bucksbaum. Nora Berrah agreed. "The LCLS is already uncovering ma more...
by LCLS News
A warm welcome to SLAC's newest associate laboratory director, Chi-Chang Kao. Kao will manage the day-to-day operations of the SSRL user facility and program, and provide the leadership and vision for the future of the SSRL science and user program. Kao will also have an appointment on SLAC's faculty as a professor of photon science. "The unique combination of SSRL and LCLS makes SLAC the most exciting place for photon science in the world," Kao said. "SSRL has a long and impressive history more...
by LCLS News
Monday's dedication of the Linac Coherent Light Source celebrated the construction, commissioning and first results from the groundbreaking new scientific tool. A collection of photos from the day and a video of SLACers sharing their congratulations, shown during the dedication, are available in "LCLS Dedication: The Celebration." more...
by Persis Drell
On Friday, April 10, 2009 at 10 p.m. the phone rang. I was sound asleep (lab directors go to bed early on Friday night) and as I struggled to open my eyes, the voice on the other end said "We have a laser!" And with that, the LCLS era at SLAC had begun. The seeds for that late-night, jubilant announcement had been planted many years earlier. It began with a very smart accelerator physicist, Claudio Pellegrini, with a very good idea and a vision. That vision, helped, fostered and developed by Her more...
SLAC Press Release
Secretary of Energy Steven Chu dedicated the LCLS, the world's first and most powerful X-ray laser, at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. "The LCLS shows what the scientific workforce of our nation, in cooperation with our international partners, is capable of achieving," said Secretary Chu. "Pioneering research will remain critical if the U.S. is to stay a global leader when it comes to innovation and competitiveness." Stanford University President John Hennessy sp more...
by LCLS News
Office of Science Deputy Director for Science Programs Patricia Dehmer and Associate Director Marc Jones recently paid a short but productive visit to SLAC, highlighted by a tour of the LCLS instruments, both present and future. A discussion of the future of photon science was followed by a tour, led by Keith Hodgson, Director of Photon Science, of the new PULSE offices and labs in Building 40, and the space that is presently being renovated for the SIMES. The tour continued to the LCLS Near and more...
by LCLS News
Some people seem to be born knowing just what they want to do with their lives. Some people never figure out what they want to be when they grow up. SLAC Instrument Scientist John Bozek falls into a third category. When it came time to choose a career, he wasn't sure want he wanted, but he knew what he loved. With that knowledge in mind, finding his place as the first instrumentation scientist of the AMO science instrument—the first user instrument at the LCLS, the first hard X-ray laser—became more...
by LCLS Announcement
Amidst the daily hustle it is sometimes good to take a break and exhale. Two such opportunities are coming up in the next two weeks for the entire lab. The first is an opportunity to "Pause," to look at our progress in working safely, remind ourselves not to let our guard down and slip back into bad habits, and take the time to think how we can do even better. The second is a SLAC milestone event on Monday, August 16: the LCLS Dedication. We will take a moment to reflect on a lab-wide accomplish more...
by LCLS News
A short but detailed technical introduction to the LCLS appeared online in Nature Photonics. Coordinated by Paul Emma, head of the LCLS accelerator physics group and with contributions from many of his LCLS teammates, the paper is a virtual tour of the LCLS in six pages plus references and acknowledgements. Users "We thought the LCLS really deserved a high-visibility, refereed publication to communicate its capabilities and for a clear reference to similar efforts elsewhere," Emma said. "Surpris more...
by LCLS News
Leader of the autonomous Basque government Patxi López and a small group of delegates visited SLAC in July as part of a cultural tour across the US. Their interest in visiting the lab included learning about accelerator science and fostering collaborative relationships as they seek to build an accelerator facility of their own. LCLS Deputy Director Uwe Bergmann led the group to the Klystron Gallery and the LCLS Near Experimental Hall, where he discussed SLAC science and answered questions. more...
Linac Coherent Light Source
by Paul Emma
In July, AMO users at the LCLS experimented with a novel piece of technology that aims to make the world's quickest X-ray pulses even quicker. Paul Emma and his team suggested inserting a thin piece of slotted aluminum foil, creating a barrier with a narrow door in the middle. Only the electrons with a direct path through the door contribute to the laser pulse, while the electrons that hit the foil are scattered. The tapered slot is 2.2 millimeters wide at the top and narrows to about 220 micron more...
by LCLS News
LCLS Made Local News (KGO)-- After a decade of construction, scientists at SLAC have turned on the world's biggest x-ray machine. It's a 3-mile long laser beneath Highway 280 on the Peninsula - call it the Hubble Telescope for atoms. "Not every accelerator I've worked on has turned on as quickly as this one. It was a dream come true." The man expressing delight is John Galayda, who was in charge of designing the LCLS. The machine is a laser crossing Highway 280 two stories underground. The first more...
by LCLS News
SLAC recently hosted an international group of ultraviolet and X-ray scientists, including several LCLS users, at the Ultrafast Vacuum Ultraviolet and X-ray Physics Workshop, July 19-21. Billed as a satellite meeting of the 37th International Conference on Vacuum Ultraviolet and X-ray Physics in Vancouver July 11-16, the workshop brought together almost 60 researchers from at least seven countries to learn more about research using ultrafast pulses at short wavelengths in general, and using the more...
by LCLS News
DOE announced the creation of a new Energy Innovation Hub aimed at finding a practical way of making fuels with an artificial version of photosynthesis. Led by the California Institute of Technology and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, the new Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis will include work at SLAC, Stanford, and University of California campuses in Berkeley, Santa Barbara, Irvine and San Diego. more...
by LCLS News
With the coming dedication of the LCLS, the word "laser" is generally associated with "X-ray" in the minds of people at SLAC, and for good reason. But there are many other lasers here: lasers for researchers using SLAC resources, lasers for SLAC research and the injection laser that enables the LCLS to generate its coherent X-ray laser beam. Bill White and his team of self-proclaimed "laser monkeys" in the LCLS Laser Science Department try to support all of them. When White arrived at SLAC five more...
LCLS-PULSE Logo
by LCLS News
The doors to the new LCLS office building (901) officially opened in July. The offices are across the road from the LCLS Near Experimental Hall. "If the LCLS didn't already feel like a 'reality,' this really makes it sink in," said LCLS Deputy Director Uwe Bergmann. The building helps unite many LCLS staff who had previously been scattered across campus. "It's great to have everyone together, and to be closer to the instrument," Bergmann said. He added that having more people close to the LCLS more...
by LCLS News
The first user experiments on the LCLS Soft X-ray instrument began in July. Research led by Andreas Scherz, a physicist at the SIMES, and Jan Lüning from the University Pierre and Marie Curie in France looked to explain on the nanoscale how magnetic fields switch between "up" and "down" states—a key process used to store data in computers. Researchers have been investigating this phenomenon since 1996 with a variety of experimental techniques. X-rays have been used to probe magnetic films with a more...
SLAC Press Release
The first published scientific results from the world's most powerful hard X-ray laser, located at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, show its unique ability to control the behaviors of individual electrons within simple atoms and molecules by stripping them away, one by one—in some cases creating hollow atoms. These early results—one just published in Nature, the other last week in PRL—describe in great detail how the LCLS's intense pulses of X-ray light change th more...
by LCLS Announcement
The preliminary schedule for LCLS experiments scheduled October 2010 through March 2011 has been posted to the LCLS website. During the first user-assisted commissioning rounds, we will bring up 3 instruments: the AMO instrument was commissioned during the fall of 2009; the SXR instrument was commissioned during the Spring of 2010; and the XPP instrument began commissioning in June 2010, when the first hard x-rays were delivered. These milestones helped to complete LCLS construction on time and more...
by LCLS Announcement
The first LCLS user scientific results published in Physical Review Letters. The report is the first look at how molecules respond to ultrafast pulses of ultra-bright light from the world's most powerful X-ray laser. The results were surprising, according to lead author Matthias Hoener, a postdoctoral researcher from Western Michigan University who was part of a team led by WMU physicist Nora Berrah. more...
by LCLS News
On June 7, the X-ray Pump Probe instrument became the first of the LCLS scientific instruments to receive hard X-rays. "This is a big milestone for everyone involved," said instrument scientist David Fritz. "Now the fun begins!" The XPP instrument will be the third of LCLS's six instruments to go online, but the first hard X-ray instrument. "Hard" X-rays have higher energies and shorter wavelengths than "soft" X-rays, so they penetrate further into materials. This instrument will first "pump" sa more...
by Cathy Knotts
On 6/7/10 at 4:15 pm in SLAC Panofsky Auditorium, Henry Chapman from the Centre for Free Electron Laser Science at Hamburg/DESY will talk about the first results on coherent imaging of nano crystals using LCLS. This new form of protein nanocrystallography may open a new avenue for high-throughput membrane protein crystallography. A new frontier is being opened. Come share in the excitement! more...
by LCLS News
X-ray science is getting a boost from a marriage of technologies. Scientists already had instruments that can separate colors of light, but don't pulse fast. And they have fast-pulsing lasers that can't pick more than one color. Enter the Soft X-Ray Materials (SXR) Science instrument that will open to experimenters very shortly. It can do both at once. By combining the LCLS ultra-fast laser pulses with a monochromator, which selects wavelengths from a large range of energy, scientists will soon more...
by LCLS News
Marco Cammarata studies the superfast, from both a biological and a physical perspective. As a researcher at the ESRF in France, he studied the quick movements of the photosynthetic protein found in the bacteria strain Blastochloris viridis. Now at SLAC, Marco works as an instrument scientist with the LCLS X-ray Pump Probe (XPP) instrument, which uses the ultrafast X-ray pulses of the LCLS to study molecular movement, among other phenomena. The XPP team is currently busy fine-tuning and testing more...
by Cathy Knotts
A detailed scheduled of activities for further LCLS user-assisted commissioning experiments scheduled for the Spring/Summer 2010 has been posted to the web. http://www-ssrl.slac.stanford.edu/lcls/users/documents/lcls-sched-2010.pdf more...
by LCLS News
For the first time, scientists at the SLAC National Accelerator Center pumped ultra-short X-ray pulses through the Soft X-ray Materials Research instrument yesterday. The team has begun aligning the beam for commissioning measurements, and the first shift of user experiments are slated for early July. more...
Joachim Stöhr, director of SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source
by LCLS News
It is 6:18 p.m. on Thursday night and I am getting a late start writing my SLAC Today column for tomorrow. I had planned to write it on LCLS-II because we just got the green light ... more...
by LCLS News
Visit the LCLS Accelerator Division webpage to follow the LCLS Control Room Summary Display which is a snapshot taken every five minutes. From this page, you can also link to LCLS Machine Parameters and the list of LCLS Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ). https://slacportal.slac.stanford.edu/sites/lclscore_public/Pages/Default.aspx more...
SLAC Press Release
The DOE granted approval for SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory—home of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the world's first hard X-ray laser—to begin planning a second X-ray laser at the laboratory. The LCLS, which began operation in April 2009, generates ultra-fast, ultra-bright pulses of X-ray laser light which are already providing new insights into the atomic world. LCLS-II will would give investigators access to new regions of the X-ray spectrum and improved control over the X-ray b more...
by LCLS Announcement
The demands on LCLS resources in the coming two years are going to be extreme in order to turn on all five of the new instruments as scheduled. It will therefore not be possible for LCLS to support the integration of new user-supplied endstations in any of the hard X-ray hutches. New user-supplied endstations will only be supported on SXR if user proposals are approved by the LCLS Proposal Review Panel and they pass the LCLS Technical Feasibility Review. Endstations which have already been insta more...
by LCLS Announcement
The capabilities of SLAC’s LCLS were featured in an article published on-line this week in Science News, Lasing Beyond Light - Physicists focus on whole new types of waves, from beams of sound and plasma swells to looking for ripples in spacetime, May 8, 2010; Vol.177,#1 http://www.sciencenews.org/view/feature/id/58504/title/Lasing_Beyond_Light more...
by LCLS Announcement
The LCLS has turned back on after a very successful downtime that began before the Christmas break. Several major projects involving groups from across the lab were completed in advance of the turn-on, including LCLS beam line installations. FEE beam lines were installed to allow X-rays to be directed to any of the three Near Experimental Hall hutches, increasing the number of experiments that can be conducted in a beam-sharing mode in future runs compared with the single AMO experiment last run more...
by LCLS Announcement
X-ray pulses for the first time traveled through the LCLS X-ray Transport Tunnel and to the Far Experimental Hall—an achievement that marks the final milestone needed for the Department of Energy to review and approve the LCLS construction project as successfully completed. more...
by LCLS Announcement
LCLS achieved its project completion (CD-4) milestone of delivering first photons to the Far Experimental Hall at approximately 1 pm Thursday, April 22, 2010. more...
by LCLS Announcement
The LCLS's sixth scientific instrument, the Matter in Extreme Conditions (MEC) instrument, is blitzing through the project planning and approval stages. Project Manager Richard Boyce and Instrument Scientist Hae Ja Lee hosted a successful review of the DOE milestone Critical Decision 1 in January, and received final approval on March 1. With CD-1, the project's preliminary budget and design plans are now approved, and Boyce and Lee are working hard to obtain approvals to start construction by ea more...
Joachim Stöhr, director of the Linac Coherent Light Source at SLAC
by LCLS Announcement
Joachim Stöhr, director of the Linac Coherent Light Source at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, will deliver the 2010 Robert Hofstadter Memorial Lectures on April 12 and 13. The lectures were established in memory of Nobel Prize-winning physicist Robert Hofstadter, who served on the physics faculty from 1950 until his death in 1990. more...
by LCLS Announcement
The Coherent X-Ray Imaging (CXI) instrument will make use of the unique brilliant hard X-ray pulses from LCLS to image single sub-micronparticles. more...
by Jo Stöhr
2009 was an eventful and successful year for the LCLS Project. The world's first "hard" x-ray free-electron laser reached full performance specification and its first experiment station was successfully commissioned. more...
by LCLS Announcement
The finish line for the Linac Coherent Light Source's Soft X-ray Materials Research instrument is barreling into view. In a few short months, the SXR should be in position to host user groups for a variety of different experiments, from surface chemistry to magnetic ordering to superconductivity and beyond. more...
by LCLS Announcement
The Linac Coherent Light Source is unique in many ways, and SLAC's Photon Controls and Data Systems group knows it. The group plays a key role in ensuring the safe delivery of data from its birth in the experiment instruments, all the way to completed analyses. To do so, the PCDS group is constantly adapting to the challenges that arise from such a state-of-the-art and totally unique machine. more...
by LCLS Announcement
A hearty congratulations to everyone involved the creation and construction of the Linac Coherent Light Source Far Experimental Hall. Yesterday, the FEH officially opened with a ribbon cutting ceremony and handing over of the official FEH "key" to LCLS Deputy Director Uwe Bergmann. SLAC employees from various stages of development were on hand to enjoy cake and tour Hutches 4, 5 and 6. more...
by LCLS Announcement
As Einstein pointed out, time is relative. For astrophysicists investigating galaxies light years away, a decade is a pinprick on a long continuum. For particle physicists tracing the movement of photons and electrons, a second is an eternity. more...
by Jo Stöhr
In my last SLAC Today column on October 9, 2009, I reported about the start of experiments at the Linac Coherent Light Source. We on the LCLS team can now say that the first experimental run from October 1 to December 18, 2009 was a resounding success. LCLS has proven that it can deliver X-rays with the properties we had hoped for, and our users have already used them to create exotic states of matter such as atoms without electrons, and recorded images of invisibly small nano objects with only more...
by LCLS Announcement
Paul Emma has provided this FAQ to help you plan future proposals. Samples Q's include: 1) What is the photon energy range which LCLS can provide and how long does it take to switch? 2) What is the highest pulse energy available (number of photons in the pulse) and how does it vary with photon energy and pulse length? 3) Who do we contact, both before and during the experiment, to request changes or special parameters, and who do we contact for questions on x-ray beam characteristics? more...
by LCLS Announcement
We are currently limited to a spectral range down to 750 eV, but we are developing operations at lower energies, down to 510 eV, for the future. The minimum pulse duration in standard operation is ~ 70 femtoseconds FWHM. The minimum pulse duration in standard operation is ~ 70 femtoseconds FWHM. We have developed lower current operation which is now available for users. In this low current moded pulse lengths have been shown to be less than 20 femtoseconds. We believe the pulses are much shorter more...
LCLS-SSRL Seminar
by LCLS Announcement
LCLS-SSRL seminar "The interpretation of K pre-edges, RIXS-MCD and distortions in fluorescence yield spectra", Frank de Groot (Utrecht University), January 20, 2010, 3:30 PM, SSRL Conference Room, B137, Room 322. A brief introduction is given of x-ray absorption spectroscopy, including the multiplet interpretation of XAS spectral shapes. more...
LCLS-PULSE Seminars
by LCLS Announcement
Coherent control is based on manipulation of quantum phases of wave functions. It is a basic scheme of controlling a variety of quantum systems from simple atoms to nanostructures with possible applications to novel quantum technologies such as bond-selective chemistry and quantum computation. We have developed high-precision wave-packet interferometry by stabilizing the relative quantum phase of two molecular wave packets on the attosecond time scale. more...
LCLS-PULSE Seminars
by LCLS News
Three-dimensional(3D) topological insulators (TIs) are a new state of quantum matter with a bulk gap and odd number of relativistic Dirac fermions on the surface. The robust surface states of TIs can be the host for many striking quantum phenomena, such as an image magnetic monopole induced by an electric charge and Majorana fermions (whose anti-particles are themselves) induced by the proximity effect from a superconductor. more...
LCLS-PULSE Seminars
by LCLS News
LCLS-PULSE seminar "Strong field Quantitative Rescattering Theory - self-imaging of molecules by their own electrons", Prof. C. D. Lin, Kansas State University, November 30, 2009, 4:00-5:00 PM, Bldg 137, Room 322. We have developed a quantitative rescattering theory (QRS) where we showed that high-energy above-threshold-ionization (HATI) electrons generated by an intense infrared laser pulse can be used to extract the elastic scattering differential cross sections (DCS) between FREE electrons more...
by Cathy Knotts
Thank you to everyone who submitted a proposal in response to the third LCLS Call for Proposals which ended on November 4. We received 107 new proposals: 16 for AMO, 32 for SXR, and 59 for XPP. more...
by Nicolas Bock
University of Western Michigan physicist Nora Berrah wrapped up her research group's five-day run on the Linac Coherent Light Source on October 20. Their project marked the first time that the powerful X-ray laser had been used to study molecules. It was a complex experiment, and Berrah readily acknowledged that the work wouldn't have been possible without the teamwork and cooperation of the LCLS Atomic, Molecular and Optical instrument scientists and engineers. But she also gave a big nod to an more...
by Nicolas Bock
Software engineers with the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control Systems Group in the SLAC Controls Department unveiled the Linac Coherent Light Source Real Time 24 Hour Display last week, giving all SLAC employees and on-site users access to real-time status updates on the LCLS X-ray beam. more...
by LCLS Announcement
In early October, researchers from around the globe began traveling to SLAC to get an initial glimpse into how the X-ray laser interacts with atoms and molecules. The LCLS is unique, shining light that can resolve detail the size of atoms at ten billion times the brightness of any other manmade X-ray source. “No one has ever had access to this kind of light before," said LCLS Director Jo Stöhr. “The realization of the LCLS isn’t only a huge achievement for SLAC, but an achievement for the global more...
LCLS-PULSE Logo
by Cathy Knotts
Election results were announced at the LCLS Users' Meeting on October 20, 2009. Congratulations to Todd Ditmire (AMO), Jan Luning (SXR), Oleg Shpyrko (XCS) and Martin Meedom Nielsen (XPP) who were elected to the LCLS Users' Executive Committee. more...
Video by Calla Cofield and Brad Plummer.
by Brad Plummer
Instrument scientist Christoph Bostedt gives an inside view of operations at the Atomic, Molecular and Optical science instrument and first user science at the Linac Coherent Light Source in this SLAC video profile. more...
Monday's first plenary session in Panofsky Auditorium. (Photo by Lauren Knoche.)
by Lauren Knoche
The SSRL/LCLS Users' Meeting and Workshops finished up October 21 following three full days of presentations. more...
The letters
by Shawne Workman
While not the smallest lettering ever created, the tiny initials "LCLS" have been written with what may be the world's most potent pen. Etched into boron carbide, a super-hard substance used in accelerator shielding and body armor, the lettering has helped researchers at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory explore the capabilities of the world's first hard X-ray laser, the Linac Coherent Light Source. more...
Visiting scientists from The Ohio State University with LCLS colleagues. (Photo: Nicholas Bock.)
by Nicolas Bock
It's been a busy few weeks at the Linac Coherent Light Source. The Atomic, Molecular and Optical instrument's second user group, led by The Ohio State University physicist Louis DiMauro, wrapped up a five-day run early Tuesday morning, and the third group is set to start science today. more...
LCLS-PULSE Logo
by LCLS Announcement
The LCLS offers a powerful route to recovering the structure of individual biomolecules from random diffraction snapshots of series of identical molecules. However, biological molecules can assume a variety of conformations. Mapping the conformational heterogeneity of macromolecules presents a formidable challenge to X-ray crystallography, single-molecule coherent diffraction, and cryo-electron microscopy. more...
The Echo-7 experiment.
by Jo Stöhr
With experimentalists just beginning to reveal the ultrafast secrets of atoms and molecules in motion with the Linac Coherent Light Source, researchers at SLAC are already working on the next generation of X-ray free electron laser. Building on theoretical work by SLAC beam theorist Gennady Stupakov, the Echo-7 experiment will test a new way to produce an X-ray beam with an important characteristic not found in today's X-ray lightsources. more...
The AMO instrument scientists with the first LCLS users in the instrument hutch.
by Kelen Tuttle
SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source opened for business this morning, and the first user experiment is now underway. As the world's first hard X-ray laser, the LCLS offers scientists the ability to study the fundamental behavior of atoms and molecules on unprecedented length- and time scales. more...
A dozen LCLS undulators (silver) installed along the undulator hall.
by LCLS Announcement
This month the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (Stanford, CA) will open the world's shortest-wavelength free-electron laser for use by guest scientists. First operated in April at 0.15 nm the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is the first free-electron laser to emit hard x-rays. The LCLS can deliver 80 fs pulses containing about 10 trillion x-ray photons at wavelengths tunable between about 0.15 and 1.5 nm. more...
LCLS-PULSE Logo
by LCLS Announcement
LCLS-PULSE seminar "THz pulses from 4th generation lightsources: Perspectives for fully synchronized THz pump X-ray probe experiments", Dr. Michael Gensch, BESSY, Helmholtz-Center Berlin, Wednesday, September 23, 2009, 4:00-5:00 PM, Bldg 137, Room 322. more...
The main experimental chamber of the AMO instrument, the high-field physics end-station.
by LCLS Announcement
It takes a lot of energy to strip all ten electrons from an atom of neon. Doing it from the inside out, knocking away the most-closely-held, innermost electrons first, is an even rarer feat. But the brilliant X-ray pulses of the Linac Coherent Light Source have done just that, in the successful first test of the unprecedented X-ray laser with its first scientific instrument. The result demonstrates the machine's unique capabilities—with the world's brightest and shortest X-ray laser pulses—and m more...
by LCLS Announcement
The Linac Coherent Light Source beam will pack a wallop, providing 10 trillion X-ray photons in a flash of about 100 femtoseconds. For comparison, it takes today's best storage-ring-based synchrotron radiation facilities a full second to provide that many photons. Beginning next spring, researchers will begin to conduct experiments with these powerful bursts of X-ray light using the Soft X-Ray instrument, located on the second LCLS beamline to begin operation. more...
Three-dimensional model of the delay line.
by LCLS Announcement
A prototype device capable of splitting an x-ray pulse into two adjustable fractions, delaying one of them with the aim to perform x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy and pump–probe type studies, was designed, manufactured, and tested. The device utilizes eight perfect silicon crystals in vertical 90° scattering geometry. Its performance has been verified with 8.39 keV synchrotron radiation. more...
by Lauren Knoche
Last week at the 31st Free Electron Laser Conference in Liverpool, United Kingdom, SLAC physicists David Dowell and Paul Emma were awarded the FEL Prize for their technical achievements with the LCLS, and John Galayda accepted a certificate for the entire LCLS team, lauding their excellent work in creation and commissioning of the unprecedented machine. more...
The XPCS technique for observing equilibrium dynamics.
by LCLS Announcement
Photon correlation spectroscopy with coherent X-rays reveals the elementary diffuseive motion of atoms. Nature Materials, News & Views, Stephenson et. al., September 2009. more...
by Kelen Tuttle
The LCLS AMO team first opened the beam shutter, letting in the beam and bathing the instrument in the world's brightest, shortest pulses of laser X-rays. The AMO team is now carefully aligning the instrument and will spend the next several weeks finalizing preparations for the first experiments, which will begin in early October. more...
LCLS Director: Joachim Stöhr
by LCLS Announcement
In 1999, a year before I joined SLAC, Keith Hodgson asked me to chair a committee with the charge to develop and document the scientific case for a new revolutionary light source at SLAC. The committee brainstormed about what to do with pulses of X-rays that were ultrashort and ultrastrong and had this special property called coherence. Many of us went through a rapid learning curve, exploring what such hot beams would do to a sample, what it meant that the pulses were a thousand times faster th more...
SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory
by LCLS Announcement
SLAC will receive $21.8 million in new ARRA funding that will catalyze instrumentation construction and improvements at the laboratory's two light source research facilities, LCLS and SSRL. more...
by Paul Emma
The LCLS achieved SASE FEL saturation at a fundamental wavelength of 1.5 Angstroms on April 14, 2009. This achievment was presented at the 2009 Particle Accelerator. more...
Workshop participants take a break outside the Research Office Building.
by LCLS Announcement
With the launch of the LCLS just around the corner, scientists are already talking about ways to extend the capabilties of the world's first operating hard X-ray free electron laser, or FEL. more...
by LCLS Announcement
The LCLS has had a dramatic start up at its shortest wavelength (1.5 Å) reaching saturation on April 14, 2009 with 1.1 mJ per pulse energy. This is the baseline performance, but there is room for more and this workshop will discuss the scientific opportunities that near term options for enhanced performance (wavelength reach, polarization, pulse duration, multiplexing options, etc.) will enable as well as the science drivers for the long term development of LCLS. more...
by Cathy Knotts
We would like to present to you with the second LCLS Users’ Newsletter. The newsletter will be published periodically to bring you updates from LCLS. Since Issue 1, many new exciting things have happened at LCLS, amongst others... more...
by Persis Drell
Even before the Linac Coherent Light Source achieved lasing, the first call for proposals for beam time went out. Twenty-eight proposals were submitted by 219 scientists from 16 countries to get beam time on the Atomic, Molecular and Optical science instrument in fall 2009. An external proposal review panel selected the 11 best proposals. Each experimental team is sending a team member to SLAC in July to participate in the commissioning of the instrument and there will be first beam to the users more...
by Nicolas Bock
The first science instrument for the Linac Coherent Light Source was moved into its experimental hutch yesterday, marking a major milestone in preparing the Linac Coherent Light Source for its first wave of users this September. A team of riggers and vacuum assembly staff moved the Atomic, Molecular and Optical instrument from the Mechanical Fabrication Department Vacuum Shop to the Near Experimental Hall, Hutch 1. more...
by Persis Drell
The individuals who serve at the associate laboratory director level at SLAC are an extraordinarily dedicated group. For the past two years, Steve Kahn has led the Particle Physics and Astrophysics Directorate through some of the most turbulent years at the laboratory. Dale Knutson has led the Linac Coherent Light Source Directorate for the last year, and brought additional leadership to the laboratory that is delivering success not only in LCLS, but also in the LCLS Ultrafast Science Instrument more...
by LCLS Announcement
Nikolaus Schwentner, Free University Berlin, May 27, 2009, 4:00-5:00 PM, Bldg 40, Cypress Room. more...
by Kelen Tuttle
Coherent X-Ray Imaging instrument, the fourth scientific instrument to be installed at the Linac Coherent Light Source is scheduled to come online in 2011. more...
lcls-pulse logo
by LCLS Announcement
Dr. Hae Ja Lee, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 10:00 - 11:00 am, Bldg. 137 2nd floor conference room. more...
The AMO and SXR hutches sit in the Near Experimental Hall
by LCLS Announcement
The deadline for submitting proposals for experiments with soft X-rays at the AMO and SXR stations is May 15th. more...
lcls
by LCLS Announcement
LCLS Seminar: "Longitudinal Coherence Measurements at FLASH"; William F. Schlotter, University of Hamburg, Institute for Experimental Physics; Tuesday May 5, 2009, 10:00-11:00 AM, Redwood (ROB) Building 48, Room B. more...
The LCLS beam
SLAC Press Release
The world's brightest X-ray source sprang to life last week at the U.S. Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) offers researchers the first-ever glimpse of high-energy or “hard” X-ray laser light produced in a laboratory. more...
by LCLS Announcement
LCLS-PULSE: "Tunable angular momentum and ultrafast magnetization dyanmics in GdFeCo"; Andrei Kirilyuk; Wednesday April 29, 2009, 2:00-4:00PM, Cypress Room, Bldg. 40. more...
by John Galayda
I don't expect I will ever, as long as I live, see such a beautiful, smooth turn-on of any light source. more...
by LCLS Announcement
n April 10, Dr. David Shapiro will present "Soft X-Ray Scattering at Beamline 9-0-1 of the Advanced Light Source" at 2 pm in the Second Floor Conference Room of Building 137. more...
by LCLS Announcement
On April 9, Sogang University's Prof. H. Kim Sogang will present "Coherent X-ray Scattering for Nanostructures & Surface Dynamics" at 4 pm in the Red Slate Room, Building 280C. more...
Seminar
by LCLS Announcement
After successful commissioning of the LCLS injector and main linac with its 2 bunch compressors in 2008, the new beam transport line through the undulator hall to the main dump was commissioned earlier this year with one undulator already installed. more...
The proposed MEC endstation would support studies of materials in extreme environments.
by LCLS Announcement
Interested scientists are invited to participate in the proposed Matter in Extreme Conditions endstation at SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source, and to attend next month's MEC workshop. more...
LCLS team members stand by the newly installed undulators.
by Paul Emma
SLAC's linac started up again last Wednesday after three weeks' downtime to install 21 of the 33 undulator magnets that will help generate X-rays in the Linac Coherent Light Source. The LCLS commissioning team completed the installation and initial alignment with impressive speed, taking less than half the time allotted for the work. If all continues to go well, the linac's electron beam could make its first test run through the new undulators as soon as April 4. more...
LCLS-PULSE Seminar: LCLS-I and Beyond
by Jerry Hastings
Scientists at SLAC and other institutions have been thinking and modeling upgrades to LCLS. These range from near transform limited pulses to new undulators to polarization control. The properties of LCLS will be reviewed and these opportunities and the challenges they present will be described. more...
LCLS Users Tour the Facility
by Kelen Tuttle
Even though the Linac Coherent Light Source's Atomic, Molecular and Optical science instrument has yet to be assembled, the first AMO users were already on site last week for the First AMO Beamtime Preparation Meeting. more...
by Lisa Grossman
Machinery up and down the last third of the linear accelerator fell silent Monday morning when the Linac Coherent Light Source shut off for three weeks of scheduled downtime. more...
XPP Instrument Scientist David Fritz (center) with the XPP engineers.
by Kelen Tuttle
After journeying more than 100 meters through undulators and diagnostic equipment, X-rays from the Linac Coherent Light Source will wiggle into the subterranean Near Experimental Hall and, beginning in 2010, zip into the X-ray Pump Probe science instrument. more...
Dale Knutson
by Dale Knutson
The Linac Coherent Light Source is presently in its third phase of electron beam commissioning. more...
John Bozek stands near a poster showing the AMO instrument.
by Kelen Tuttle
When the Linac Coherent Light Source starts producing the world's first hard X-ray laser pulses later this year, they will all be headed to one place: the Atomic, Molecular and Optical science instrument. more...
by Lisa Grossman
The Linac Coherent Light Source reached another milestone last Wednesday evening, when a beam of electrons wiggled its way through a row of magnets and produced the instrument's first X-rays. more...
Physicists and operators in the LCLS control room
by Kelen Tuttle
On Saturday afternoon, December 13, a series of electron beams zipped down the full length of the Linac Coherent Light Source for the first time. more...
SLAC's LCLS open house on Thursday, Dec. 4
by Shawne Workman
More than 500 lab employees signed up for a firsthand look at the newly constructed facilities for the Linac Coherent Light Source during last Thursday's LCLS tour. more...
Inside the LCLS injector vault where the laser heater is installed.
by Michael Torrice
As the leaves change and temperatures drop, it's time to turn the heat on—even for the electron beam at the Linac Coherent Light Source. Thanks to some last-minute hard work, the LCLS laser group installed a laser heater for the stream of electrons that will power the X-ray laser. more...
SLAC facilities staff members discuss the Turner-LCLS handover.
by Brad Plummer
On November 17, Turner Construction achieved "Substantial Completion" of civil construction on the Linac Coherent Light Source site; Turner has finished up all major field construction, and is beginning review of their written plans for the new buildings with SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory staff. more...
by Kelen Tuttle
The SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Main Control Center is usually fairly quiet during the annual two-month shutdown of the linear accelerator. But this year, the operators were hard at work leading a renovation project to improve the ergonomics of the MCC and fully integrate controls for the Linac Coherent Light Source. more...
Inside the LCLS Beam Dump area.
by Brad Plummer
This fall, the change of seasons coincides with a change in momentum in the construction of the Linac Coherent Light Source. Since the closing weeks of summer, the LCLS construction fences came down, contractors are wrapping up the last of the civil construction and hardware installation is taking off. See the progress in this gallery of recent images taken throughout the LCLS facility. more...
The LCLS total energy sensor, to be used during commissioning.
by Brad Plummer
The Linac Coherent Light Source will generate X-rays 10 billion times brighter than any source before it. Being the first of its kind, the LCLS has presented engineers with a number of unique technical hurdles. Measuring just how much punch the LCLS beam actually packs has proved especially challenging. more...
Undulator support girders are now being installed in the Undulator Hall.
by Brad Plummer
The temperature is now stabilized at a mild 68 °F (20 °C), support pedestals are in place and aligned, the paint is dry and physicists are moving in. That's the scene in the Linac Coherent Light Source Undulator Hall, where the last items on the civil construction punch list are being checked off. more...
by Calla Cofield
A physicist, a chemist and a microbiologist walk into a bar… or better yet, a conference on X-ray imaging. It's not the set-up for a joke, but a good opportunity for Mike Bogan to interface with potential users of the Linac Coherent Light Source. more...
Vacuum group Pacesetter Award recipients and colleagues.
by Brad Plummer
Several colleagues at Argonne National Laboratory in Chicago recently received special recognition for their contributions to the Linac Coherent Light Source. more...
by Brad Plummer
Construction highlights for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) this month include... more...
Physicist Axel Brachmann with a vacuum transport chamber.
by Brad Plummer
The injector for the Linac Coherent Light Source has a shiny new electron source, or cathode, thanks to a recent repair project aimed at correcting a problem that began earlier this summer. more...
The XPP instrument.
by Brad Plummer
Congratulations to the scientists and engineers of the Linac Coherent Light Source Ultrafast Science Instrumentation project, or LUSI. The team last week successfully completed Department of Energy review for Critical Decision 2, or CD2. more...
A two-person crew uses a laser to align components in the Beam Transport Hall.
by Brad Plummer
The balance of activity on the Linac Coherent Light Source project has shifted from building infrastructure to installing hardware, with all but the final construction "punch-list" items completed. The tunnels, utilities, fire suppression systems, cooling water and electrical systems are nearly ready for prime time. more...
by Brad Plummer
Construction highlights from the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) this month include... more...
Inside the cavernous Far Experimental Hall.
by Brad Plummer
Construction of the Linac Coherent Lights Source (LCLS) continues at a rapid pace. Since the completion of tunneling earlier this year, crews have finished out the Far Experimental Hall and X-ray Tunnel, installed utility systems in the Central Utilities Plant and throughout the facility, and are approaching completion of the Near Experimental Hall (NEH). more...
X-rays capture the action as a tiny silicon wafer explodes.
by Brad Plummer
Flash imaging of nanoscale objects undergoing ultrafast changes is now a technical possibility, according to a recent paper published in the June 22 edition of Nature Photonics. The results are a direct precursor to research that will be conducted using SLAC’s Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). more...
by Brad Plummer
Construction highlights for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) for June, 2008 include... more...
Jochen Schneider
by Brad Plummer
This month SLAC welcomes Jochen Schneider, the most recent addition to the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) team. Schneider initially came to SLAC last January as a visiting professor. His appointment as new director of the Experimental Facilities Division for the LCLS marks a big step toward making the LCLS a scientific reality. more...
More than 50 prospective users attended the LCLS AMO Workshop at SLAC this week.
by Brad Plummer
This week, more than 50 prospective Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) users arrived at SLAC for a workshop focusing on the Atomic, Molecular and Optical (AMO) science instrument. more...
by Brad Plummer
What do you get when you combine 120 concrete trucks filled with more than 1,000 cubic yards of concrete, with 350,000 pounds of steel rebar? "Happy physicists," according to Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) Conventional Facilities Manager David Saenz. more...
by Brad Plummer
Construction highlights from the Linac Coherent Light Source for May, 2008 include... more...
SLAC Director Persis Drell
by Persis Drell
The Office of Science semi-annually conducts reviews of its large major projects and this week it focused on the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Dan Lehman, the Director of the Office of Project Assessment in the Office of Science, leads this process and he arrived at SLAC with a large team of world-class scientists, engineers and management consultants to look over all aspects of the LCLS project. more...
Mike Zurawel with the LCLS undulator pedestals in End Station A.
by Brad Plummer
Installation of the first undulator pedestals for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is set to begin this week in the Undulator Hall. The final shipment of the stands arrived at SLAC last April from Argonne National Laboratory, where they were designed. more...
3D rendering of the AMO instrument
by Brad Plummer
In preparation for the upcoming call for proposals to use the LCLS for AMO experiments, a workshop will be held at SLAC June 2-3, 2008 to inform future AMO users of the status of the LCLS and assist them with preparing their proposals for beam time. more...
LCLS construction team with a set of newly arrived support stands
by Brad Plummer
Last week, trucks arrived with the first shipment of specially designed stands for Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) magnets and diagnostics to be installed in the Beam Transport Hall. This section of the LCLS, called the "linac-to-undulator," will connect the end of the linac to the undulator magnet arrays. more...
The tunnel is prepped for the final breakthrough
by Brad Plummer
The tunneling breakthrough into the Far Experimental Hall (FEH) of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) on January 14th was the culmination of months of planning and excavation work. Having begun nearly a year ago, the FEH cavern is nearly complete, with only the pouring of the concrete slab floor remaining. Once the floor is poured, construction of the experimental hutches can begin. more...
The first LCLS undulator to be mounted to its girder, undergoing coordinate measurement
by Brad Plummer
Last week, undulator work in SLAC's Magnetic Measurement Facility (MMF) for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) entered a new chapter as workers for the first time mated an undulator with the girder to which it will eventually be mounted in the Undulator Hall (UH). more...
LCLS Director, John Galayda
by John Galayda
When the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) was first conceived in 1992, an x-ray free-electron laser was considered an expensive and technically high-risk endeavor to create a light source with unprecedented and indeed uncertain potential. Early SLAC reports describing the LCLS concept hint at its scientific potential, but not much more. more...
John Galayda addresses onlookers just after tunneling crews punched through the final few feet
by Brad Plummer
Yesterday morning a crowd of about 60 onlookers, bedecked in hard-hats and reflective vests, witnessed the final tunneling break through for construction of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) in the dimly lit cavern of the Far Experimental Hall (FEH). more...
The Affholder Inc. second shift tunneling crew working on the LCLS
by Brad Plummer
While most of SLAC sleeps, a select group remains hard at work, driving ahead construction progress on the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Since last spring, tunnel contractor Affholder Inc. has used double shifts to speed ahead tunneling progress, with the second shift on the clock from 4:00 p.m. to 2:00 a.m. more...
SLAC Director, Persis Drell
SLAC Press Release
Menlo Park, CA—Persis S. Drell has been named director of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), effective immediately, Stanford University President John Hennessy announced Thursday. Drell, a professor of physics at SLAC, has held a series of sen more...
A camera took this image of the LCLS beam's cross section
by Heather Rock Woods
How do you take a picture of something as thin as a strand of hair that's moving at the speed of light? more...
Inside the Near Experimental Hall crews are finishing out installation of utilities
by Brad Plummer
Construction crews working on the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) site are busier than ever these days. Last week, the Beam Transport Hall, which bisects the research yard, began receiving the final yards of concrete for the roof after being connected to the Undulator Hall. more...
A cartoon of the planned X-ray Correlation Spectroscopy Instrument
by Amber Dance
As construction continues on the experimental halls that will receive the beam from the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the instruments that will go inside still exist only in the minds and computers of the designers. But in the past few months, those instruments are getting closer to reality. more...
Ben Poling (left) and Ed Akerstrom with the six-ton granite block Akerstrom acquired on Craigslist.
by Brad Plummer
The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) project is a collaboration that brings together components and equipment from dozens of suppliers. Last month, Craigslist.org joined that supply chain. more...
Rows of undulators rest in the Collider Hall.
by Brad Plummer
Last week, a team working with the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) construction project repositioned dozens of undulator magnets to make room for pre-assembly of the undulator support pedestals. For months, the undulators have remained stored in wooden crates in the Collider Hall, and now the first stages leading to their installation next year are set to begin. more...
SLAC Director, Persis Drell
by Persis Drell
Pief Panofsky built a laboratory with a single purpose: to probe the fundamental structure of matter with the world’s largest electron accelerator. During his lifetime, the lab reinvented itself many times in order to stay on the frontiers of scientific discovery. more...