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Linac Coherent Light Source
LCLS
LCLS News

by LCLS Announcement
Call for Proposed Experiments with Soft and Hard X-rays at the LCLS AMO, SXR, XPP, CXI, XCS, and MEC Experimental Stations. LCLS encourages scientists from diverse fields to propose experiments utilizing the LCLS’s unique capabilities to be carried out January – May 2013. Proposed experiments must be submitted by 4 pm Pacific, July 10, 2012. more...
by LCLS News
The Linac Coherent Light Source doesn't shut down for the Thanksgiving holiday, so LCLS laser division member Ryan Coffee and the rest of his team did the next best thing: They brought Thanksgiving dinner to their experiment. more...
by LCLS News
In 2009, when biophysicist Ilme Schlichting and her colleagues applied to use the X-ray laser at SLAC’s Linac Coherent Light Source, they added a radical idea to their proposal: They would make all the data they collected on two viruses and a nanoparticle available to the public one year after the experiment ended. more...
by LCLS Announcement
After four hugely successful runs, operation of the Linac Coherent Light Source has been paused briefly to prepare for the Nov. 17 start of Run 5 – the first that will see all six experimental stations come online. more...
by LCLS Announcement
Shutdown doesn't mean slow down for workers at the LCLS. With three successful experimental runs completed at the world's most powerful X-ray laser, scientists turned off the X-ray beam in March so they could install and maintain equipment, make improvements and prepare for the next run of experiments. more...
by LCLS News
The first set of user experiments with the Linac Coherent Light Source's newest instrument is under way, and about 40 researchers are working very long hours this week to decipher the structures of proteins involved in photosynthesis, parasitic disease and other important life processes. more...
by LCLS Announcement
The Coherent X-ray Imaging instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source achieved the first X-ray image from its newly installed detector last Tuesday. The detector was installed inside the instrument’s vacuum-sealed experimental chamber in January. Through this week, CXI instrument scientists will test and adjust the new device in preparation for arrival of the first experimental users this Sunday. more...
CXI
by LCLS News
X-rays entered the Linac Coherent Light Source's Far Experimental Hall for the first time Saturday, as part of commissioning for the Coherent X-ray Imaging instrument. more...
Interference pattern
by LCLS News
The third round of experiments at the Linac Coherent Light Source began earlier this month at a whole new level of capability. more...
by LCLS News
The X-ray Pump Probe (XPP) instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source is installed and ready for its first user experiments several weeks ahead of schedule, thanks in part to funds provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment which supported more than 40% of the XPP project. The instrument will take advantage of the ultrafast X-ray pulses delivered by the LCLS beam to observe important chemical and biological processes, including the photosynthetic generation of chemical energy and the more...
by LCLS News
Associate Laboratory Director of the Linac Coherent Light Source and Photon Sciences Professor Jo Stöhr received a "belated birthday present" earlier this week when he received notification that he had won the 2011 Davisson-Germer Prize from the American Physical Society "For the development of soft-X-ray-based spectroscopy and microscopy leading to fundamental contributions to the understanding of chemical bonding, magnetism and dynamics at surfaces and interfaces." Jo was recognized for semina more...
by Cathy Knotts
Registration is open for the annual LCLS/SSRL Users' Conference, October 17–21. The event is a valuable opportunity to learn about the latest plans, developments and exciting user research at LCLS and SSRL. The conference will feature several LCLS workshops including: LCLS II; Data Analysis; Bio XFEL; HEDS; AMO; and SXR. The plenary session on October 18 will include updates from the DOE, LCLS and SSRL, a user science poster session and reception, and a keynote talk from Jens Norskov on 'Convert more...
by LCLS News
It's been a busy time here at LCLS. To date, we received 314 proposals from 1,094 scientists from 25 countries - a very impressive metric of interest in the LCLS from the scientific community! We expanded the LCLS Proposal Review Panel to over 50 experts in 7 areas. The PRP met 9/13-14 to review and rank 116 proposals submitted for Run 4 which is scheduled to start at the end of May 2011. The top ranked proposals are currently undergoing feasibility and safety reviews. We expect to notify the pr more...
by LCLS News
Barely two months after publication of the first LCLS results on hollow atoms, two papers published in Physical Review Letters unveil the first results for hollow molecules. These studies show that the unprecedented intensity of the LCLS beam can reveal detailed information about a molecule's structure and dynamics. "The LCLS is proving its mettle as a machine for discovery in strong-field atomic and molecular physics," said Phil Bucksbaum. Nora Berrah agreed. "The LCLS is already uncovering ma more...
by LCLS News
Monday's dedication of the Linac Coherent Light Source celebrated the construction, commissioning and first results from the groundbreaking new scientific tool. A collection of photos from the day and a video of SLACers sharing their congratulations, shown during the dedication, are available in "LCLS Dedication: The Celebration." more...
SLAC Press Release
Secretary of Energy Steven Chu dedicated the LCLS, the world's first and most powerful X-ray laser, at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. "The LCLS shows what the scientific workforce of our nation, in cooperation with our international partners, is capable of achieving," said Secretary Chu. "Pioneering research will remain critical if the U.S. is to stay a global leader when it comes to innovation and competitiveness." Stanford University President John Hennessy sp more...
by LCLS News
Some people seem to be born knowing just what they want to do with their lives. Some people never figure out what they want to be when they grow up. SLAC Instrument Scientist John Bozek falls into a third category. When it came time to choose a career, he wasn't sure want he wanted, but he knew what he loved. With that knowledge in mind, finding his place as the first instrumentation scientist of the AMO science instrument—the first user instrument at the LCLS, the first hard X-ray laser—became more...
Linac Coherent Light Source
by Paul Emma
In July, AMO users at the LCLS experimented with a novel piece of technology that aims to make the world's quickest X-ray pulses even quicker. Paul Emma and his team suggested inserting a thin piece of slotted aluminum foil, creating a barrier with a narrow door in the middle. Only the electrons with a direct path through the door contribute to the laser pulse, while the electrons that hit the foil are scattered. The tapered slot is 2.2 millimeters wide at the top and narrows to about 220 micron more...
by LCLS News
The first user experiments on the LCLS Soft X-ray instrument began in July. Research led by Andreas Scherz, a physicist at the SIMES, and Jan Lüning from the University Pierre and Marie Curie in France looked to explain on the nanoscale how magnetic fields switch between "up" and "down" states—a key process used to store data in computers. Researchers have been investigating this phenomenon since 1996 with a variety of experimental techniques. X-rays have been used to probe magnetic films with a more...
SLAC Press Release
The first published scientific results from the world's most powerful hard X-ray laser, located at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, show its unique ability to control the behaviors of individual electrons within simple atoms and molecules by stripping them away, one by one—in some cases creating hollow atoms. These early results—one just published in Nature, the other last week in PRL—describe in great detail how the LCLS's intense pulses of X-ray light change th more...
by LCLS Announcement
The first LCLS user scientific results published in Physical Review Letters. The report is the first look at how molecules respond to ultrafast pulses of ultra-bright light from the world's most powerful X-ray laser. The results were surprising, according to lead author Matthias Hoener, a postdoctoral researcher from Western Michigan University who was part of a team led by WMU physicist Nora Berrah. more...
by LCLS News
On June 7, the X-ray Pump Probe instrument became the first of the LCLS scientific instruments to receive hard X-rays. "This is a big milestone for everyone involved," said instrument scientist David Fritz. "Now the fun begins!" The XPP instrument will be the third of LCLS's six instruments to go online, but the first hard X-ray instrument. "Hard" X-rays have higher energies and shorter wavelengths than "soft" X-rays, so they penetrate further into materials. This instrument will first "pump" sa more...
by LCLS News
X-ray science is getting a boost from a marriage of technologies. Scientists already had instruments that can separate colors of light, but don't pulse fast. And they have fast-pulsing lasers that can't pick more than one color. Enter the Soft X-Ray Materials (SXR) Science instrument that will open to experimenters very shortly. It can do both at once. By combining the LCLS ultra-fast laser pulses with a monochromator, which selects wavelengths from a large range of energy, scientists will soon more...
by LCLS News
Marco Cammarata studies the superfast, from both a biological and a physical perspective. As a researcher at the ESRF in France, he studied the quick movements of the photosynthetic protein found in the bacteria strain Blastochloris viridis. Now at SLAC, Marco works as an instrument scientist with the LCLS X-ray Pump Probe (XPP) instrument, which uses the ultrafast X-ray pulses of the LCLS to study molecular movement, among other phenomena. The XPP team is currently busy fine-tuning and testing more...
by LCLS News
Visit the LCLS Accelerator Division webpage to follow the LCLS Control Room Summary Display which is a snapshot taken every five minutes. From this page, you can also link to LCLS Machine Parameters and the list of LCLS Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ). https://slacportal.slac.stanford.edu/sites/lclscore_public/Pages/Default.aspx more...
by LCLS News
For the first time, scientists at the SLAC National Accelerator Center pumped ultra-short X-ray pulses through the Soft X-ray Materials Research instrument yesterday. The team has begun aligning the beam for commissioning measurements, and the first shift of user experiments are slated for early July. more...
by LCLS Announcement
The demands on LCLS resources in the coming two years are going to be extreme in order to turn on all five of the new instruments as scheduled. It will therefore not be possible for LCLS to support the integration of new user-supplied endstations in any of the hard X-ray hutches. New user-supplied endstations will only be supported on SXR if user proposals are approved by the LCLS Proposal Review Panel and they pass the LCLS Technical Feasibility Review. Endstations which have already been insta more...
by LCLS Announcement
The LCLS's sixth scientific instrument, the Matter in Extreme Conditions (MEC) instrument, is blitzing through the project planning and approval stages. Project Manager Richard Boyce and Instrument Scientist Hae Ja Lee hosted a successful review of the DOE milestone Critical Decision 1 in January, and received final approval on March 1. With CD-1, the project's preliminary budget and design plans are now approved, and Boyce and Lee are working hard to obtain approvals to start construction by ea more...
by LCLS Announcement
The Coherent X-Ray Imaging (CXI) instrument will make use of the unique brilliant hard X-ray pulses from LCLS to image single sub-micronparticles. more...
by Jo Stöhr
2009 was an eventful and successful year for the LCLS Project. The world's first "hard" x-ray free-electron laser reached full performance specification and its first experiment station was successfully commissioned. more...
by LCLS Announcement
The finish line for the Linac Coherent Light Source's Soft X-ray Materials Research instrument is barreling into view. In a few short months, the SXR should be in position to host user groups for a variety of different experiments, from surface chemistry to magnetic ordering to superconductivity and beyond. more...
by LCLS Announcement
The Linac Coherent Light Source is unique in many ways, and SLAC's Photon Controls and Data Systems group knows it. The group plays a key role in ensuring the safe delivery of data from its birth in the experiment instruments, all the way to completed analyses. To do so, the PCDS group is constantly adapting to the challenges that arise from such a state-of-the-art and totally unique machine. more...
by LCLS Announcement
A hearty congratulations to everyone involved the creation and construction of the Linac Coherent Light Source Far Experimental Hall. Yesterday, the FEH officially opened with a ribbon cutting ceremony and handing over of the official FEH "key" to LCLS Deputy Director Uwe Bergmann. SLAC employees from various stages of development were on hand to enjoy cake and tour Hutches 4, 5 and 6. more...
by LCLS Announcement
As Einstein pointed out, time is relative. For astrophysicists investigating galaxies light years away, a decade is a pinprick on a long continuum. For particle physicists tracing the movement of photons and electrons, a second is an eternity. more...
by LCLS Announcement
Paul Emma has provided this FAQ to help you plan future proposals. Samples Q's include: 1) What is the photon energy range which LCLS can provide and how long does it take to switch? 2) What is the highest pulse energy available (number of photons in the pulse) and how does it vary with photon energy and pulse length? 3) Who do we contact, both before and during the experiment, to request changes or special parameters, and who do we contact for questions on x-ray beam characteristics? more...
Video by Calla Cofield and Brad Plummer.
by Brad Plummer
Instrument scientist Christoph Bostedt gives an inside view of operations at the Atomic, Molecular and Optical science instrument and first user science at the Linac Coherent Light Source in this SLAC video profile. more...
The letters
by Shawne Workman
While not the smallest lettering ever created, the tiny initials "LCLS" have been written with what may be the world's most potent pen. Etched into boron carbide, a super-hard substance used in accelerator shielding and body armor, the lettering has helped researchers at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory explore the capabilities of the world's first hard X-ray laser, the Linac Coherent Light Source. more...
Visiting scientists from The Ohio State University with LCLS colleagues. (Photo: Nicholas Bock.)
by Nicolas Bock
It's been a busy few weeks at the Linac Coherent Light Source. The Atomic, Molecular and Optical instrument's second user group, led by The Ohio State University physicist Louis DiMauro, wrapped up a five-day run early Tuesday morning, and the third group is set to start science today. more...
The main experimental chamber of the AMO instrument, the high-field physics end-station.
by LCLS Announcement
It takes a lot of energy to strip all ten electrons from an atom of neon. Doing it from the inside out, knocking away the most-closely-held, innermost electrons first, is an even rarer feat. But the brilliant X-ray pulses of the Linac Coherent Light Source have done just that, in the successful first test of the unprecedented X-ray laser with its first scientific instrument. The result demonstrates the machine's unique capabilities—with the world's brightest and shortest X-ray laser pulses—and m more...
by LCLS Announcement
The Linac Coherent Light Source beam will pack a wallop, providing 10 trillion X-ray photons in a flash of about 100 femtoseconds. For comparison, it takes today's best storage-ring-based synchrotron radiation facilities a full second to provide that many photons. Beginning next spring, researchers will begin to conduct experiments with these powerful bursts of X-ray light using the Soft X-Ray instrument, located on the second LCLS beamline to begin operation. more...
Three-dimensional model of the delay line.
by LCLS Announcement
A prototype device capable of splitting an x-ray pulse into two adjustable fractions, delaying one of them with the aim to perform x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy and pump–probe type studies, was designed, manufactured, and tested. The device utilizes eight perfect silicon crystals in vertical 90° scattering geometry. Its performance has been verified with 8.39 keV synchrotron radiation. more...
by Kelen Tuttle
The LCLS AMO team first opened the beam shutter, letting in the beam and bathing the instrument in the world's brightest, shortest pulses of laser X-rays. The AMO team is now carefully aligning the instrument and will spend the next several weeks finalizing preparations for the first experiments, which will begin in early October. more...
by Nicolas Bock
The first science instrument for the Linac Coherent Light Source was moved into its experimental hutch yesterday, marking a major milestone in preparing the Linac Coherent Light Source for its first wave of users this September. A team of riggers and vacuum assembly staff moved the Atomic, Molecular and Optical instrument from the Mechanical Fabrication Department Vacuum Shop to the Near Experimental Hall, Hutch 1. more...
by Kelen Tuttle
Coherent X-Ray Imaging instrument, the fourth scientific instrument to be installed at the Linac Coherent Light Source is scheduled to come online in 2011. more...
The proposed MEC endstation would support studies of materials in extreme environments.
by LCLS Announcement
Interested scientists are invited to participate in the proposed Matter in Extreme Conditions endstation at SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source, and to attend next month's MEC workshop. more...
LCLS Users Tour the Facility
by Kelen Tuttle
Even though the Linac Coherent Light Source's Atomic, Molecular and Optical science instrument has yet to be assembled, the first AMO users were already on site last week for the First AMO Beamtime Preparation Meeting. more...
XPP Instrument Scientist David Fritz (center) with the XPP engineers.
by Kelen Tuttle
After journeying more than 100 meters through undulators and diagnostic equipment, X-rays from the Linac Coherent Light Source will wiggle into the subterranean Near Experimental Hall and, beginning in 2010, zip into the X-ray Pump Probe science instrument. more...
John Bozek stands near a poster showing the AMO instrument.
by Kelen Tuttle
When the Linac Coherent Light Source starts producing the world's first hard X-ray laser pulses later this year, they will all be headed to one place: the Atomic, Molecular and Optical science instrument. more...
More than 50 prospective users attended the LCLS AMO Workshop at SLAC this week.
by Brad Plummer
This week, more than 50 prospective Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) users arrived at SLAC for a workshop focusing on the Atomic, Molecular and Optical (AMO) science instrument. more...
3D rendering of the AMO instrument
by Brad Plummer
In preparation for the upcoming call for proposals to use the LCLS for AMO experiments, a workshop will be held at SLAC June 2-3, 2008 to inform future AMO users of the status of the LCLS and assist them with preparing their proposals for beam time. more...